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that happens is people come in who have been using technology, and they have their own systems for use in it, and we let them. we do not try to change how people are using it. an example of that is my grandmother. she was a wonderful baker. i miss her, but i miss her baked goods more. she never had used a still in the old country that had thermostat. she would turn the stove on all the way to broil, and it would heat up like a furnace, and then she would turn it off, and then put her stuff in and cook it. if it got too cold, she would turn it on again. it drove my parents crazy, but she made wonderful food. she was never going to learn this technology, but she had adapted to it. we recognize that people do that. if people have something that works, you leave it alone. another issue that people have on computers is -- and it is a real frustration for a lot of seniors -- that things do not show up in the same place. we try to set up people's computers so that it is recognizable. if you are using a macintosh, and it has the dock that has all the controls on it, you set it up so that it is alway
they really care about books. >> august 4 and fifth on c-span2. >> the use of drums domestically continues to rise. there will be 300,000 runs in the sky by 2020. they are used by some federal agencies in college. we will hear from a college professor who is able to hijack a civilian drone to show their vulnerabilities. >> the committee will come to order. first, as a matter of business, and he is running late. i would ask unanimous consent as a member of the said committee for this hearing. seeing no objection, do you have any objection? [laughter] i now recognize myself for an opening statement. our ability for the border. they began first looking at these drones back in 2004. now they own 10 uas aircraft. they have been used for bridges, levies, riverbed at risk of flooding, and assisted with national guard resources responding to local flooding. they have also gained support of others. the systems have become a force multiplier for military operations and for border security. we are on the edge of a new horizon. currently there are 200 active certificates of authorization issued by the
issuings. but i don't think europe will put us in a whole. experts make up only two percent of american gdp. if you see the u.s. banks pull back on lending we'll have problems. >> to victoria's point. then europe and china matter more on the u.s. economy. what do you think? >> i think we were so burned by the 2008 melt down that many people didn't see we overdo the threat on the horizon. victoria is right. it takes a couple of 10ths of a point and we are perilous close to a rescission. i don't think it is a big event. rick, they are worried about the fiscal christs and we have a capitol strike going on. u.s. treasuriers saying we are parking 50 percent of the debt in u.s. backings. isn't that poor of problem. >> we hear the bad news and it makes us nervous . victoria hit the fact on the nose. two percent of the gdp comes from the sales.own yes, recessin highly unlikely. what does worry me. u.s. banks have far more exposure to the european front than we are told. it is a credit crunch we could do without. >> i think mike hasn't heard the news yet. the u.s. housing market bottomed on tuesday
and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the sta
christs and we have a capitol strike going on. u.s. treasuriers saying we are parking 50 percent of the debt in u.s. backings. isn't that poor of problem. >> we hear the bad news and it makes us nervous . victoria hit the fact on the nose. two percent of the gdp comes from the sales. slow down yes, recession highly unlikely. what does worry me. u.s. banks have far more exposure to the european front than we are told. it is a credit crunch we could do without. >> i think mike hasn't heard the news yet. the u.s. housing market bottomed on tuesday . more good news, because costs are low in the u.s. we are bringing manufacturing back to the u.s.. there is a 50-50 chance we'll repeal obama care. >> not a chance. >> greece is about the size of connecticut and maybe it will not affect the u.s. economy. if our banks had taken the time to shore up the balance sheet. you think what matters most is washington d.c. policy. who is going to be elected president is going to matter a lot . what is happening in congress is a big wild card here . europe, i am not as worried about europe. i agree w
. >> an to calcutta, india. sex workers are barred from entering u.s. and holding alternative conference. we will take a look at the aids epidemic in black america and speak with congress member barbara lee of california. >> we need to make some noise. we need to put eradicating hiv and aids at the front burner of our political agenda, both here and abroad. >> all that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. syrian troops continue to bombard the city of aleppo in a bid to reclaim areas held by rebel forces. there have been reports of syrian helicopters backed by fighter jets firing from above, forcing hundreds of residents to flee. and allepo resident said syrian forces had fired indiscriminately, killing civilians. >> two brothers and their uncles were killed, another is between life and death. tend shells on a daily basis and this village has not had any sign of armed groups. we are targeted only because we call for freedom. >> speaking in washington, secretary state clinton said of killing of syrian president bashar al-assad is inev
that joe's human. he's not the godly saint that some of us made him out to be, including myself. >> reporter: tonight a family spokesman issued a statement saying, joe paterno wasn't perfect. he made mistakes and he regretted them. meanwhile, lawyers for curley and schultz criticized the freeh report, calling it a lopsided document based on an incomplete report. brian? >> mike isikoff, state college, pa, tonight. thanks. >>> bob costas of nbc sports is already at our olympic headquarters in london preparing to host the olympic coverage on nbc. bob, the big question, i guess, is, what does this do to penn state, the program, the school, the brand, the aura of the nittany lions? >> well, the aura, the reputation, that's already been badly tarnished. i think even the most staunch loyalists realize something that can't be rationalized away occurred here. and then outside penn state, the reputation of the university has taken a very, very serious hit. the ncaa has a term that it sometimes uses when punishing schools for violations in their athletic departments, lack of institutional
you mentioned, and what if you tell us though name of your firm. one of the things that was mentioned is they coordinate with the other engineering and design people and the construction firm, and one of the major problems with these kinds of construction projects is coordination, making sure that everybody is building the same building and everything fits together right. in large measure, that is the architect's job. do you make sure that the structural stuff fits together, with the architecture and the mechanical? >> that is where we earn most of our money. >> that is difficult? >> no question, we had cahill come on board at the later stages of design to help with the construction, details, flexing of systems, that sort of thing. >> we're fortunate today to have john with us, who was a soil engineer. one of the design teams, one of the original first persons to be looking at this project is the soil engineer. they look at where the building will be built, what is the soil like, and how we make the building hit the ground. people say, you go down to bedrock. are we going down to bedr
of communications technology that the target was using that whether by wire, cable, or satellite transmission. the result was a carve out from the court approval for surveillances that targeted communications made from overseas locations. with the change in technology over the intervening years since 1978, that carve out has started to break down and the government found itself expending significant manpower generating applications for surveillances against persons outside the united states. as a result the government was unnecessarily expanding resources and increasingly forced to make tough choices regarding surveillance of targets. to the enduring credit, they recognized that this was untenable in a post-9/11 world and after a year of careful consideration, it passed the faa. first it authorized the fisa court to improve categories of non-u.s. persons intelligence targets overseas without providing the government to provide an individualized application that brought the operation of pfizer back in line with the original intent. second it established a system of oversight by the fisa court
, we just want to let us innovate, let us do our thing. those areas of technology where entrepreneurs are allow today go forward are ones which would work great in countries around the world. that's all the opportunity you want. let innovation flourish. and to policymakers or lawmakers come down to this? do they enjoy seeing this? >> guest: they're very busy, and they do like coming down. it's tough getting them to las vegas. we think it's very important that policymakers see what the real world is like so they can make informed decisions when they're actually making votes and doing other things that are affecting, basically, how you can build products, what you can do, who you trade with, things like that. great american companies like apple and google and others are -- we have them here in the united states, and we have great international companies here. but it's working. the u.s. is the world leader. we want to keep it that way. but it's important we have the right policies. >> host: when we walked into the displays here, we saw your table, the cea table, and you had your legislat
and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and goin
you to lead us. >> happy birthday to you happy birthday to you happy birthday, mayor lee happy birthday to you ♪ ♪ [applause] >> we would like to thank -- ed, please make a wish in blowout the candles -- and blow out the candles. [laughter] [applause] we would like to thank peter of the california culinary academy, a person here to say a few words about this beautiful cake. >> thank the. mr. mayor, on behalf of the california culinary academy, where like to wish you a happy birthday. this is made and designed by our very own pastry chefs. chefs, please come out. and one of his many students. this cake is totally edible. and we made enough that it will be able to serve 500, if the mayor cuts small little pieces. [laughter] any way, happy birthday. >> thank you very much! wonderful! >> whoo, happy birthday to mayor ed lee! we have a party in the house! thank you. and we are all going to get to have a piece. thank you. we're going to remove the cake so that it can be cut and you could each have a piece. meanwhile, we will have the finale, and we ask everybody to stand up and d
, the exchanges between the governments and the companies between the two sides. as the largest economy in the u.s., california boasts the resources and a strong advantage in high tech, bio-science, agriculture, fisheries, and the forestry, and even tourism. and in terms of cooperation with china, california enjoys exceptional economic, cultural, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisc
capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and others. the systems have become a force multiplier for military operations and for border security. however, we run the edge of the new horizon. using unmanned aerial systems within the homeland currently are 200 active certificates of operation issue i the federal aviation administration to over 100 different entities such as law enforcement department and academic institutions to fly drugs domestically. this map on the monitor shows the locations of coa recipients as at april 2012. the number of recipients since that time has in fact increased. the faa plans to select 65 cities around the country for the use of nongovernment euros this year and plans to
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
executive arnie gundersen about the report and what it means for u.s. plants. then a look at serious operations in africa and how the united states rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from tanzania. and protests against the u.s. mining giant newmont are escalating in peru. five participants in those protests have been killed in the past week. a state of emergency has been declared. >> the government is mistaken if it thinks it is going to crash the justified cries of the people. >> we will speak with amy goodman in spain today, 75 years after the bombing of that city. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm juan gonzalez. i am filling in for amy goodman. the u.s. and european union are calling for new sanctions on syria similar to those used against the gaddafi regime ahead of the nato attack on libya. at an international friends of syria gathering in paris, secretary of state clinton invoked the threat of chapter 7 under the u.n. charter, which ranges from economic embargos to military force. the news co
level is looking to san francisco to set the standard for all of us. thank you. >> any additional public comment? >> if you do not mind, i will jump on and on this. the director and i attended a little bit of a workshop related to the collection of this data, and who we are in the base of silicon valley where we can start to take data, utilize it, use it to make decisions, create maps about where areas might be deficient, not only for housing, but for senior housing, retail as well. i look forward to anything that brings us closer to that. some folks over at uc berkeley really created a sort of a sense city where you were able to forecast what a city could be like -- sort of create a "sim city." commissioner antonini: my only concern is that this is interpreted in the right way. we have a changing population, as everyplace does, changing demographics ethnically and demographically, and we should not be trying to lock in the status quo of percentages of income levels and housing. we do have to reevaluate as there is a population change in income levels change your housing needs based upon
that there will not be a housing related to development of medical uses at the cathedral hill campus. the appellants state that the eir fails to consider the demand for housing from employees. however, we analyze it this demand. the demand can be accommodated by current residential vacancies and projects currently in the pipeline. the demand from cathedral built employees would not result in it and our mental and pets. because it comprises development of nonresidential projects on nonresidential sites, the proposed project would not conflict with the ability to comply with housing element objectives. appellants state the eir faiiled to mitigate near-term impact from air quality. the draft eir identified mass' pollutants as an unavoidable impact. the impact was identified as single begin to even though air quality resources are regulated. and back -- regulations require the use of best available control technology. this is because the extent to which he missions achieved -- emissions reductions achieved with these regulations are not known at this time. we still considered this impact to be significant and
comments, we did not appreciate them, and if you see the wrong thing to us, we will attack you. our response is ok, the ordinance clearly says members are free to express their opinions, to respond, and i want to thank you for the responses i have gone although i may have not agreed with each one. i respect the fact there were given and it is that give-and- take that really encourages people to participate in government. i think one of the things that i see separately is the fact that many people to not go to boards and commissions because they really do not feel that the board and commissions care about what they say. i have heard them do it. one time in a police commission meeting, they went to item no. 2 and covered a and b and went into closed session for four hours, it made everyone leave the chamber. there were 15 people that came to talk about item number two. after the four hours, they came back, covered agenda item 2c, and asked for public comment and i was the only one that was left and i said that was not right. i was told by the vice- president, you cannot talk about tha
the globe take action to boost their sagging economies. should more be done in the u.s.? >> susie: i'm susie gharib. getting new medicines to market faster. speeding up the government's drug approval process. why investors and patients are on board. >> tom: and "made in america" tonight, a craft beer company brewing up a national expansion. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the global economy was the hot topic in markets around the world today. central banks in europe, the u.k., and china announced moves to boost growth. the european central bank lowered interest rates to an all-time low. china cut several key interest rates for the second time in a month. and the bank of england held its rates steady, but said it will pump billions of dollars into its economy through a new round of bond buying. here in the u.s., some hopeful signs for the weak job market. private employers added 176,000 new workers to their payrolls in june, stronger than the previous month. and the labor department said the number of people filing for unemployment benefits dropped by 14,000 in the past
the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it is a major challenge to meet the standards of accountability and transparency. the exchange came during this unannounced stopover by the secretary of state. even if her words or encouraging, many i
vehicles, uav's. pilotless aircraft used mostly by the u.s. military for surveillance, reconnaissance, and killing, as in yemen recently. he here at home, law enforcement agencies, local police, are eager to utilize drones for civil surveillance. some already do. 146 commercial drones are now accessible for civil law enforcement nationwide. the number is expected to skyrocket. the the u.s. senate armed services committee called for allowing these drones to operate, quote unquote, freely and routinely in u.s. airspace. such authorization has rattled some members of congress. notably republican senator rand paul. he's introduced an act to prohibit the i don't say of drones by u.s. civilian government unless authorized by a warrant. that would put parameters on such usage. >> what i would say is that drones could be used if you have a proper warrant but that means you go through a judge, a judge has to say there's probable cause of a crime, but i don't want dreams crisscrossing our city and country snooping on americans. that's a surveillance state that i'm very concerned about and that'
strived to ensure that justice for those who are most vulnerable among us is had. the late justice matthew tobreaner was revered as a legal scholar and humanitarian who did not hesitate to speak out on behalf of the disadvantaged and marginalized individuals. in fact, he expressed some time ago the very fundamental principle, whatever hardship poverty may cause in society generally, the judicial process must make itself available to the indigent. it must free itself of the sanctions born of financial inability. and it is that principle that is the foundation of this award. and so a memory of justice -- and i want to give a shout out to michael and the tobreaner for working so well since 2000 on collaborating on the meaning of this award. it has been an award that pays tributes to individuals who have made extraordinary efforts to assist the most vulnerable members of our community and to strengthen the principle of equal access to justice. so today it's my honor to represent a bay area woman who exemplifies her distinguished career in the bay area for over 45 years. as the first african-am
foundation does, we use generic drugs and dave made a huge difference. and pat for money cannot be used to buy those drugs, first because eric goolsby at all the people agreed that they should anzac and because i made an agreement with president bush when he was an obvious that i would submit all of the mehdi said we sent anywhere in the world to the fda and he said if the fda approved them is the effect of an appropriate that on a local contrary could use their money to buy that meta-sin. [applause] and he kept his word. and that was the beginning of this and i'm very, very grateful for that. that means for these drugs are not available with got to do something for people without insurance who can't afford the drugs. [cheers and applause] now, our foundation has partnered with major pharmaceutical, aeneas to make access to affordable hiv medication available faster, in a simpler way on a longer-term basis of people who don't qualify for a bat, but can't afford the drug. here's the idea. we will provide a one-stop shop for uninsured patients to access all of the patient assistance progr
, and he applies the brakes or uses the steering wheel to avoid the accident. >> host: why are you up here on capitol hill? what's the importance of showing this to politicians? >> guest: first of all, we think today everyone is distracted driving. we want people to be safer, we want to expose our -- [inaudible] to capitol hill. we think there are many people who can leverage that technology in order to help us save lives, to help us spread the word out there and to, you know, the families and the drivers -- >> host: is mobileye yet available? >> guest: mobileye is available for the consumers. right now we are working with several retail chains, and we are getting more and more into the retail market, and definitely. anyone who wants the system can e-mail us at mobileye.com, we'll hook him up with an installer. >> host: isaac litman is the ceo of mobileye here at the consumer electronics show in washington. stephanie lundberg is with the ford motor company, and you have a display here at the consumer electronics show. why is ford at this tech show? >> guest: essentially, ford is a technolo
of the storms occur nowadays, all of the weather that occurs nowadays is simply different than it used to be 30 or more years ago because of climate change. >> reporter: not all scientists agree, climate change skeptics argue too much is being read into short-term data and that extreme weather events usually even out over time and don't turn into major trends. but a large majority of climate scientists say climate change is real and, scott, if they're right that means the extreme weather is only going to get worse. >> pelley: chip, thank you. as chip said, the heat is not helping with the wildfires in the west. 45 are burning tonight. tanker planes were cleared to fly again today. they had been grounded far day after an air force tanker crashed, killing four. the number of these firefighting planes is dwindling, and we asked rick sallinger of cbs station kcnc to show us why. >> you don't get much better than that. >> reporter: the specially designed c-130s can cover a quarter mile with 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant. colonel paul hargrove is with the california air national guard. >
. that's all for us tonight. >>> welcome, everyone. tonight, a keeping them honest special. an investigation into charity cheats. when you open your heart and your wallet to help a charity, how do you know your money will be put to good use? in the next hour, we're going to bring you drew griffin's investigation of the charities accused of collecting millions of dollars in donations and not spending it where donors expect it. one of the charities under scrutiny is called the disabled veterans national foundation. that's their logo, looks very official. dvnf. there is no sign that any of the cash donations, $56 million they have raised over three years, went directly to the men and women who sacrificed so much in war zones, not one dime. because of drew's reporting, the senate finance committee is demanding answers from the dvnf. more on that tonight. drew also uncovered yet another veterans charity called the national veterans foundation, which is taking donations, but using only a very small percentage to actually help vets. there are also charities that claim to help aban
>> good morning, everyone. thanks so much for getting up with us. hope you had a great day yesterday. a lot of tired people out there this morning. >> but you're watching us and that's good. i'm heather childers. thanks for watching "fox & friends first." >> the top five at 5:00. it is day six of darkness for at least one million people along the east coast. now, some of them aren't expected to get electricity back until sunday. now, to get a good perspective on the scope of these outages check out these before and after aerial images of washington, d.c. this was actually released by nasa. the photo significantly darker on the right following that deadly storm that killed 26 people. >> auto amazing pictures. an insider attack leaves five american soldiers injured outside a nato base in eastern afghanistan. a witness says afghan civilians were talking to the soldiers when a man in an afghan army uniform opened fire with a machine gun. >> iran delivering a disturbing threat to the united states as it holds a new round of war games. iran claiming that it can destroy nearby mi
feasibility analysis. near-term pressures require the use of level three does look predicament pelters. these are capable of producing a particular matters by 85%. appellants argue that the final eir cannot rely on the cities recently adopted reduction plan to claim that impacts will be less than significant or to mitigate ghd index because of deficiencies in the cities plan. appellants argued that additional mitigation should be required. the cities qualified ghd reduction strategy for the qualified plan meets the requirement because this plan was reviewed and they concluded that ghg reduction strategy meets the craig terry. iteria. is this my? i'm sorry. >> is your 15 minutes. thank you very much. i am sure there will be questions. i will start the conversation. so in the appellants appeal, they spend a lot of their time talking about transit issues. i wanted to talk about that for a few minutes. there are 4 categories of transit issues. we know this is a quarter that is already significantly congested. every day you can go down during rush hour -- some of the contract. we know that
we used to say faculty took 80% to. and 200 years ago it makes them in the effective. it is to start on the aspect of the college and university the way academic programs are delivered. you will say a much greater savings. . . for thi hearing. see no objection, mr. duncan, yet no objection to that? i now recognize myself for an opening statement. unmanned aerial systems commonly known as drone has been a game changer for men and women serving in iraq and afghanistan. the systems have provided troops with eyes in the skies have taken the flight to the enemy. to eliminate the most dangerous al qaeda terrorist, drums have increased capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and
and getting us a two-year bill, a blueprint on the big picture ahead that really allows us to put our friends and neighbors to work in construction jobs. but the celebration today about this announcement is important because it really does take us to the next generation of technology. when this tower is open, as michael will tell you, it will have the next-generation technology for guiding planes in and out of this airport and guiding people on those planes in the safest possible way. i am delighted to be here for the community, those that serve on the board and leadership positions to say thank you for what you're doing with the people of this area. and to modernize this great airports of people can fly safely in and out of san francisco. thank you for including me today. >> it is my great pleasure to introduce the acting administrator, a longtime friend andrea leader delivering on successful partnerships not only with the control towers. also working on delay reduction as well. welcome the administrator, michael huerta. >> it is great to be back in san francisco. it was 105 degrees in washi
is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and prevent them from getting ho
reminded that we really are here today to have fun. i think our next speakers are really going to show us the way in that, and then we have a whole afternoon of playing and getting on with things but it is really my privilege not to introduce a lady to you who i have watched really from afar. i have really just had the pleasure of meeting ms. davis in the last few years. i can remember when i first saw her on tv and thought, here is a woman filled with dignity and compassion, so articulate, and she really helped us to understand what was happening in the world. you know, most of you know that ms. davis was the first black female journalist in the west. and she really did change the face and focus of news. she has recently written a book that is very important, both for her but for us, because it really tells the story of her life and all that has gone on in the world she has lived in. my angelo was quoted as saying "no people can say they understand the times in which they have lived unless they have read this book." the name of that book is "never in my wildest dreams." belva davis. [app
. i firmly believe that pe is a really important thing. it keeps us healthy. talk about prevention. this is prevention. it is a state-mandated requirement. i, too, have been threatened. it illustrates how far this subject will go and this issue will go that people will call you in your home all your having chant -- dinner and threaten you. that is incredible. and yet we have this resolution here today that gives them more. gives them our funds. let them supervise two schools with one instructor. because they did not comply with our requirement that its board set forward, and they are in violation of their own rules that every instructor must abide by the governing body of the school district in which they were, that we will extend them another year. if you can do this in good conscience, i am sorely disappointed in you. but i think this resolution goes too far and i am glad that our teachers came today because i have spoken to some of them and i said we might lose this vote but you have to speak up for your profession, your credential in, and also fourth escalation -- also for pe.
with the war on drugs was leading us in the wrong direction. the impact that it had and not only in communities -- quite frankly in our entire community was creating a situation which doesn't necessarily make us any safer and frankly, i think we have criminalized an area i think should be really looked upon as a health issue more than as a criminal issue, and i think consequently, a lot of the solutions we have tried in the last 2 1/2 decades have taken us to a place where today we cannot afford it economically. i can tell you that socially we have been broken for many years, but now the economic peace of it has come to play and that's probably why, quite frankly, we are reacting. i think we can deal with being socially bankrupt much easier than we can deal with being economically bankrupt. i think now we've come to the point where there's an intersection between the two. having said that, i also think it's important to recognize simply taking people that are broken, because most of the people that have drug addictions are people that are broken, and just simply releasing them on to the streets
't seem to thwart careers anymore. technology enables us to be an always-on so. put the baby down for a nap. newborn babies sleep a lot. >> and it's clear marisa my jer probably going to use a lot of technology here to balance her family and her business live. using things like baby cams and trying to use video conferencing from home when she has to take care of the baby. it will be an interesting balance and everyone will be watching. >> thank you very much. >> sky 7 is live over the scene in walnut creek. traffic is gibbing to get back to normal. just minutes ago there is a poll electrified whit fell. >> pg&e turned ouer off. the eastbound commute has kicked in to full gear. and there is slow, things are moving. >> a hayward jury awarded the children of convicted killer hans riser $60 million for damages in the loss of their mother. this verdict read before noon today, riser convicted of murder in 2008 for the death of his wife. the jury ward each child $25 million for pain and suffering and 10sed million in punitive damage autos we wanted to make darn sure the children would ha
. >> well, president obama is also talking this morning and he celebrated independence day with 24 u.s. service members as they became u.s. citizens. well, the president also using that ceremony to once again call for what he says is the need for immigration reform. listen to this. >> we remain a nation of laws and we have to remain a nation of immigrants. that's why as another step forward, we're lifting the shadow of deportation from serving -- from deserving young people who were brought to this country as children. that's why we still need a dream act to keep talented young people who want to contribute to our society and serve our country. it's why we need -- why america's success demands comprehensive immigration reform. >> and with the fourth of july holiday now over, it will be a quick return to the presidential campaign in just a few hours, president obama hitting the road as two of mitt romney's biggest supporters will be campaigning for him in the same exact areas that the president is targeting. molly henneberg is live for us in washington now with some more details. good
but the money trail led somewhere else entirely. baghdad pups is used to reunite military animals but they don't do that at all. in the montreal spca, a canadian charity, received about $13 million in donations over three years but despite all of that money, they've ended up in the hole more than $4.5 million. all of these charities have one thing in common. they all have connections to a fundraising company called quadriga art. the company gets paid to build mailing lists. that's where the money trail took drew. getting answers along the way was another. >> hi, how are you. >> we're for the going to be doing anything on camera. >> bottom line, you're not going to give me an interview? >> where is the money going? >> he's not in? >> here's the question. over three years and none of the money has gone to any veterans. ma'am? >> you think if the money was going where they said it was going and everything was on the up and up, they'd want to be completely transparent, right? drew has been investigating this for years in some cases, and they are refusing to answer. literally getting d
the longest and strongest heat wave ever recorded. molly is braving the temperatures. and bringing us more. >> the excessive heat is nothing to mess with. it is in the 110's here in washington. and from the midwest to the plains, and to the east, there are eight deaths officials say because of the high heat. three in ohio and three in wisconsin and two in tennessee. here in dc, a city built over a wamp and why they feel so darn muggy. a lot of people bring the family to see the monuments and some say it is not so bad. a number of the tourist tried to get out early and stay cool including a honeymooning couple. >> what they want to do even if it is hot. we embraced it. >> we have a bunch of kids that are sleeping back in the hotel and it is too hot for them. we came out and we'll go back and pick them up. >> we'll tough it out. >> we have many monuments that we can before we melt. >> as for the power situation in the midatlantic, 10,000 people are in the dark with no air conditioning after the powerful thunderstorms a week ago. most of them. more than 9000, of the 10,000 people are in the b
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